Stock Market Check-Back for September

So, we’re now into the final quarter of the year. The imaginary stock portfolio we set up on Jan 1, using Jason Kelly’s “The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing” is still making some very positive gains. Sparton Corp unseated the reigning champ Magna International with an amazing spike up to an 84% gain over its Dec 31 price. Sparton makes electronics, and they’ve been awarded a number of big military contracts this year. Their stock price has been growing steadily for the last few months, and it looks like they’ll have a outstanding 2013.

On the negative end of things, AEterna Zentaris and BlackBerry have both lost more than 30% of their share prices since the beginning of the year. BlackBerry is now being actively considered by a number of buyers — the most interesting of which is John Sculley, former CEO of Apple.

Overall, however, our little portfolio is going into its fourth quarter very strong. The US stocks have gained 17% over their Dec 31 value, and the Canadian stocks are up by 47%. If this was real life, I’d be a pretty happy investor right about now. We’ll check in again in November!

Company Name Closing Price
Dec 31
Closing Price
Sept 30
% Change
AEterna Zentaris Inc. 2.38 CDN 1.55 CDN -35%
Bombardier Inc. 3.76 CDN 4.79 CDN +27%
Callaway Golf Co. 6.50 US 7.12 US +10%
Cameron International Corp. 56.46 US 58.37 US +3%
Canadian Tire Corp. 81.00 CDN 128.00 CDN +58%
Cott Corp. 8.03 US 7.69 US -4%
Indigo Books & Music 10.68 CDN 10.50 CDN -2%
Koninlijke Philips Electronics 26.54 US 32.25 US +22%
Magna International Inc. 49.68 CDN 84.95 CDN +71%
BlackBerry 11.80 CDN 8.10 CDN -31%
Ryder Systems Inc. 49.93 US 59.70 US +20%
Sherwin-Williams Co. 153.82 US 182.18 US +18%
Sparton Corp. 13.87 US 25.50 US +84%
USG Corp. 28.07 US 28.58 US +2%
Westjet Airlines Ltd. 19.81 CDN 24.77 CDN +25%
Total Value $CDN $179.11 $262.66 +47%
Total Value $US $343.22 $401.39 +17%

It’s all Spanish to me — language learning with guest blogger Stephanie Medford

Happy Thanksgiving to you Canadian readers! Everyone else, I hope you had a great weekend. Today, I’m delighted to be bringing you a guest post with Stephanie Medford. She’s going to be talking all about learning another language with library resources.

Stephanie is an artist and blogger and has been in love with Edmonton for as long as she can remember. Check out her hand-printed postcards and read about her adventures in Edmonton at iheartedmonton.ca.

Take it away, Stephanie!

StephanieHello! I’m super excited to be a guest on Library Life Hack.

I’m the type of person who never pays for something she can get for free. When I decided to learn Spanish before traveling to South America, it never crossed my mind to pay for a class. I’m an independent learner and I knew the Edmonton public library had all the resources I needed. Having been in French Immersion as a child, it’s possible that my bilingual brain already had a leg up on language learning but I think that anyone who’s willing to put in the time can teach themselves a new language.

I knew that I would need a mix of resources to learn the different components of the language: speaking, listening, and reading/writing. While learning to understand and speak was my main priority, I was committed to getting a good grasp on the grammar as well, partly because I’m not one to do things halfway, and partly because I find that an understanding of small details makes the whole that much stronger. While there’s plenty of material out there, many of the resources I found were not terribly useful. Finally I stumbled on three items and used them almost exclusively during the 7 months of my self-instruction,, borrowing items for the longest period allowed, then returning them and putting them on hold again if I needed to.

The Pimsleur Language Program by Recorded Books received high reviews on the library site. It consists of a series of sequential CDs that immerse you in the language right from the start. I got the Latin American version, which was really helpful since the language is quite different in Spain (I soon learned that it varies quite a bit from country to country as well!). I listened to it in my car almost every day. The lessons repeat material over and over again, without it ever feeling redundant, so you don’t have to work to memorize anything. It’s designed so that you really know the material before it introduces anything new, and you are constantly reviewing old material. This was probably the most effective resource that I tried.

Ultimate Spanish by Living Language uses a great combination of listening, reading, and grammar and is a comprehensive introduction to the language. Lessons advanced very quickly and I found that I needed a firm grasp of the material before moving to each new chapter, which required a lot of extra study after each lesson. I liked how thorough it was but I struggled to remember things from one lesson to the next.

Complete Spanish Grammar by Gilda Nissenberg is a good guide to grammar, with plenty of exercises to practice the concepts. Because there are grammatical structures and variations in Spanish that we don’t have in English, I slowly worked through the exercises to get a handle on how the language is put together. Once I started trying to communicate I was really glad I had put in the extra time to learn the complicated verb tenses: trying to tell stories in only the present tense was no fun at all.

The final part of my self education project involved watching stacks of movies. I found an organization that has released independent movies from many Latin American countries – just search Film Movement in the library catalogue. It also pays to look through the Spanish section of the DVDs in any branch. All these helped me practice my listening skills, gave me a good understanding of how the accents vary from country to country. I watched Maria Full of Grace without subtitles and while I missed a lot of details and nuance, I was pleased that I was able to follow the story.

As obsessed as I was with learning the language, I didn’t work very hard. Outside of driving I put in maybe 3 hours a week. When I arrived in Peru I felt completely lost at first, but because I had built a solid foundation, my comprehension increased dramatically after only a couple weeks. 3 weeks in, I was already translating for others. The only thing missing from this self-study program was the opportunity for conversations. But listening to endless CDs meant I understood pronunciation and basic sentence structure, and once I was immersed in the language my speaking skills grew quite quickly!

Language learning is expensive. A 2-month “Spanish for Travellers” class costs $229 at Metro College. Rosetta Stone level One costs $199. I couldn’t find the exact Pimsleur program on Amazon but a similar Pimsleur course levels 1-4 costs from $210 – $305. Ultimate Spanish can set you back between $80 and $200 and Complete Spanish Grammar goes for around $13. Needless to say, teaching myself using library materials was definitely the cheapest option.

Thanks again for having me, and good luck in any language-learning adventures!

Here Comes the Sun(screen) — a mini-post

The finished product

The finished product


Hello! And welcome to my first mini-post.

Saying No to Chemicals
If you’ve been reading for awhile, you’ll know that I spent some of the summer experimenting with homemade cosmetics. A reader named Goldie wrote in and asked if I had any recipes for sunscreens, particularly ones that were baby-friendly, as the chemicals in commercial sunscreens are not necessarily what you want to be slathering all over little people. (I totally agree.)

And Here’s a Recipe
Goldie pointed me in the direction of Wellness Mama’s blog. My own resources had a recipe for sunscreen, but nothing that sounded as effective (or safe) as what Wellness Mama had whipped up, which has a natural SPF factor of about 20. Of course, I had to give it a try. The recipe had ingredients I was already familiar with, plus non-nano zinc oxide. (“Non-nano” simply means that the particles aren’t so finely ground up that they might be absorbed into your system through your skin.)

It knocked together very quickly — about 35 minutes start to finish. Using essential oils, I gave it a very light scent of lavender, reasoning that this would probably be baby-safe. Half of Wellness Mama’s recipe nicely filled three 1 oz. jars, which were out the door that same afternoon. I gave two to testers and tried one out on myself.

How Dedicated am I to Research?
Now, given that I burn easily, I have to admit that I had some concerns about experimenting on myself (or anyone else) with sunscreen. I mean, if a cake recipe doesn’t work, there’s some ingredients wasted and a few dishes to do. But if the sunscreen didn’t work, I was in for some skin damage and a few days of annoyance. I applied a healthy dose and re-applied often.

My other misgiving was that the zinc oxide would turn white on my skin. I was willing to sit in the privacy of my backyard looking like a ghost, but not in public. Happily, that was not the case. The sunscreen seems to sink in and leave only a slight sheen.

But It Works!
And … I can say with relative confidence that this sunscreen works. Several tests on late-summer hot days were positive. No sunburn and nice soft skin to boot.

There’s More
Now that summer is well past us, the sunscreen doubles as a very effective moisturizing body cream. Since this particular recipe has a shelf life of about six months, you can simply segue out of suncare and get a jump on the dry skin that happens in the fall and winter. I LOVE it when a product is this useful. No waste at all.

Dollars and Cents
As to the dollars and cents, it works out to $1.61 for a 1 oz. jar. By my reckoning, I would use up two or three jars in an active summer. Sunscreens come in a  very wide range of formulations and prices, so it’s difficult to do a comparison, but I’d say that an annual cost of $4.83 is quite a bit less than what I’ve paid for sunscreen for many years.

And that’s it! Thank you to Goldie for her question and see you again soon!

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