Wilted Cabbage Salad

Hello again! Today’s feature has an unusual name, but don’t let that put you off. Rather than being something that a wicked stepmother in a gothic novel would feed you, this is yummy and summer-y tasting. Read on!

Wilted Cabbage Salad

Wilted Cabbage Salad
Odd name = great taste

While it doesn’t appear in the free PDF version of “Good and Cheap” (which can be downloaded from leannebrown.com), you’ll find Wilted Cabbage Salad on page 43 of the print edition.

Ingredient Notes
The salad component of this recipe takes:

  • cabbage
  • salt
  • raw peanuts
  • green onions

And for the dressing you need:

  • olive oil
  • lemon juice (or rice vinegar)

How Did It Taste?
The recipe recommends salting the cabbage, then dressing it and letting it marinate overnight. The end product was quite good but I think I might have overdone it with the salt. It does take away some of the bitterness of the cabbage, but my salad was just a little on the salty side. However, the combination of the lemony dressing, green onions and toasted peanuts was a winner with the cabbage. I would make this again.

Money and Time
Because the Safeway store across the street from me is apparently psychic, they were selling half-cabbages this week. Which is a good thing, because even half of this recipe makes a fair bit of salad.

I ate mine with a hard-boiled egg sliced over the top and got two generous meals out of it. The total cost was $4.10 or $2.05 per meal-sized serving. And it’s a snap to put together. I forgot to time myself (oops) but I would say that it probably took me 20 minutes, start to finish.

Not A Musical Instrument
Two weeks ago, a Canadian Tire sale flyer seduced me into buying a Starfrit mandoline for $27.49. “What’s a mandoline?” you may ask. Well, it’s a kitchen gadget with a very sharp blade, designed to quickly slice or grate vegetables. Since this recipe calls for finely chopped cabbage, I thought I had the ideal opportunity to break in my little mandoline.

I followed the instructions, but after ten minutes of fiddling around, I had produced exactly a tablespoon of grated cabbage. I gave up and chopped the rest of it with a knife. But I remain undaunted. Two recipes from now, we’ll be making a version of hash and eggs that uses finely chopped brussels sprouts for the hash, so I’ll be bringing the mandoline back out for Round Two.

Before that, though, we’ll be making one last salad — this time with broccoli and apples. See you in a few days!signature

Charred Summer Salad

Hi! Today we’re chowing down on an unusual gluten-free recipe. In place of croutons, this charming Mexican-inspired salad has popcorn! Yes, popcorn. How clever is that?

Charred Summer Salad

Charred Summer Salad — gluten-free
and a great idea for using up a bumper crop of zucchini

You’ll find the recipe for  Charred Summer Salad on page 55 of the free PDF version of “Good and Cheap”, which you can download at leannebrown.com. And if you’re working with a print copy, it’s located on page 39.

Ingredient Notes
This salad is nice and simple. It takes:

  • zucchini
  • corn
  • olive oil
  • feta cheese
  • popcorn

The dressing recipe takes:

  • olive oil
  • lime
  • chili powder

How Did It Taste?
I didn’t change any of the ingredients (although I did use frozen corn instead of shucking my own) and taste-wise, I thought that this one was pretty good. With a little bit of practice and some fiddling, I think it could be really good.

But I’m not totally sold on the idea of popcorn in a salad. Sorry! It sounded so fun that I really wanted to like it.

I’d never tried charring vegetables, and I think I need some practice to get the zucchini and corn properly charred, which will enhance the flavour. (In fact, the next time I make this, I’ll focus on the zucchini and just heat up the corn in the microwave.) And I’m willing to bet that if you skipped the broiler and grilled the vegetables on a barbeque, you would wind up with some mighty fine charred zucchini.

Time and Money
It was easy to cut this down to a half-recipe, which made a generous supper for one adult. Although the salad took me about 38 minutes to put together, I’ll predict that the next time will be quicker — as I perfect my blackened-vegetable skills. And t
he total cost was $3.37.

Edible Footballs
This is a good time of year to feature a zucchini recipe. Zucchini will grow almost anywhere, which makes them ideal for the Zone 3 climate in my hometown of Edmonton. It’s been a hot summer and my co-workers are already bringing in their excess zukes, which are as big as regulation-size footballs.

So if your backyard is populated with these giant green bad boys, try out this recipe or the very yummy Chocolate Zucchini Muffins, which appear in the breakfast section of “Good and Cheap”. 

And that’s it for today! Next up, we’re going to try out Wilted Cabbage Salad, which strikes me as a very curious name for food. See you then!
signature

Taco Salad

Hello! Today, you’re in for a treat. Instead of just me nattering away about the feature recipe, I’ll be adding in the wisdom of another cook: my very good friend Peter, who just happens to be the son of a professional chef. Let’s get dicing!

Taco Salad

Taco Salad — and a lesson in spicing up ground beef

You’ll find the recipe for  Taco Salad on page 39 of the print version of “Good and Cheap”. However, this amazing little cookbook is also available as a free download at leannebrown.com, and you’ll find Taco Salad on page 52. 

Ingredient Notes
This salad is a little more complex than some of what you’ll find in “Good and Cheap”, but it’s not a back-breaker. It takes:

  • lettuce
  • ground beef or pulled pork
  • tomatoes
  • corn
  • green onions
  • tortilla chips
  • sharp cheddar, for sprinkling

The dressing recipe takes:

  • sour cream
  • lime
  • salt & pepper

I used ground beef, and didn’t change any of the other ingredients. (If you’re wanting to make this vegetarian, you can sub in beans for the beef or pork.)

How Did It Taste?
I thought it was pretty good, but not necessarily a home run. Peter, however, diagnosed the problem right away. The conversation went something like this:

“What kind of spicing did you add to the ground beef?”
“Uhm, none.”
“What did the recipe call for?”
“Uhm, none.”
“Really? Well, there’s your problem. The beef is really bland. I think if you’d added some taco spice when you were frying it up, it would be much better.”

There you have it, folks. And from someone much smarter than me. Jazz up your protein, and you’ll elevate this recipe from decent to delicious.

Time and Money
I made a full recipe, which served three hungry adults with leftovers. (We were also serving up the “Good and Cheap”recipes for Mexican Street Corn and My Dad’s Baked Beans. Which, by the way, makes a great summer lunch menu.)

The salad took about 25 minutes to put together, and the total cost was $11.28. That’s $3.76 per serving.

An Ode to the Humble Tortilla Chip
This recipe requires you to buy a bag of tortilla chips, but only use a cup of crushed ones, meaning that you’ll have some leftovers. Here’s a couple of ways to use those up:

  • Make yourself some fresh salsa (you’ll find a recipe on page 145 of “Good and Cheap” or page 163 of the free PDF)
  • If you have leftovers of the other ingredients (cheddar cheese, ground beef, green onions and sour cream) bake up a mess o’ nachos

And that’s it. Peter and I both thank you for coming to visit! Next up, we’ll look at a very interesting summer salad. See you then!
signature