Tomato Soup and Grilled Cheese

Well, hi there!

Today is our first-ever double header: soup and a yummy sandwich.

tomato_soup

Tomato Soup and a Grilled Cheese Sandwich:
A comfort food classic from as far back as I can remember

You’ll won’t find these recipes in the PDF version of “Good and Cheap” (a free download at leannebrown.com) but they are on page 29 of the print version.

Soup Ingredient Notes
The soup takes:

  • onions
  • tomatoes
  • broth

From the optional ingredient list, I added:

  • heavy cream
  • basil (more about that in a minute)
  • lemon zest

The only detour from the instructions was that I used chicken broth instead of a vegetable broth.

Sandwich Ingredient Notes
The sandwich takes:

  • bread
  • grated cheese

I used an aged cheddar and added the optional Dijon mustard.

How Did It Taste?
The soup tastes great. The only thing I’d change is to cut back on the vegetable broth by about one-third — I found the finished product a little thin, but that was easily fixed by simmering it for awhile.

The sandwich is equally delicious! The technique of using grated cheese is brilliant. It melts much more evenly and quickly than slices. I wouldn’t change a thing here.

Time and Money
I forgot to time myself, but you should be able to knock this together in about half an hour. It’s very easy.

I made a half-recipe of the soup (serves roughly three) and one sandwich. The total cost for this was $7.74, which works out to $2.13 per generous serving of soup and $1.34 per sandwich.

pesto

A small jar of pesto = a world of tasty possibilities


Add Some Zest-o with Pesto
Here’s a way to get a little of the flavour of fresh herbs without the stupidity of supermarket prices. Pesto!

Traditional pesto (which is what this is) is made up of basil, olive oil, garlic and parmesan cheese. This little jar cost me $2.98 at the Italian Centre Shop and I used a 2 teaspoons of it in the tomato soup, in the place of  a tablespoon of chopped basil leaves and two cloves of garlic.

You can also use pesto on pasta, sandwiches, in sauces … you name it. And it’s cheap, which is what we’re all about here at Library Life Hack.

Ta dah! That’s a wrap. Next week, we’re headed into the salad part of “Good and Cheap”. See you then!

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Lightly Curried Butternut Squash Soup

Hello!

Today we’re tackling a relatively simple soup with a relatively long name.

squash_soup

Lightly Curried Butternut Squash Soup
Lots of words, lots of flavour

You’ll find Lightly Curried Butternut Squash Soup on page 39 of the PDF version of “Good and Cheap” (a free download at leannebrown.com) and page 25 of the print version.

Ingredient Notes
This soup takes:

  • butternut squash
  • onions
  • green bell pepper
  • garlic
  • coconut milk
  • spices

I mostly stuck to the recipe, but a relative who over-bought for Easter dinner plunked a pair of free yams in my lap, which I thought I could safely substitute them for the butternut squash. And I had a red bell pepper to use up, so that took the place of the green one. 

How Did it Taste?
This is a really nice soup that would be great in the early fall. The one thing I’d change is to take out the cayenne pepper that the recipe calls for. I cut it in half and still ended up with a medium level of heat that overpowered the curry flavour.

I need to experiment a little more, but I really do think this soup can stand on its own without additional spiciness.

Time and Money
Instead of peeling and cubing the yams, I baked them. This added an extra step but made them super-soft and easy to work with. (See page 57 of the PDF version of “Good and Cheap”, or page 64 of the print version, for instructions.) Altogether, it took about 45 minutes to make up the soup.

I made a half-recipe and the total cost was $5.19, or $2.60 per generous serving. (I costed the yams at the current price in Save-On Foods.)

A Little Experiment
Awhile back, we took a look at a jalapeño & cheddar scone recipe. I loved these and pondered an alternate version that used asiago cheese and lemon zest.

I finally tried it out this week and I’m pleased to say that this was a highly successful experiment. I used the same quantity of cheese, but grated it, and zested a small-ish lemon. (Asiago is a drier, more crumbly cheese than cheddar and it doesn’t lend itself well to being cubed.) I also added about a tablespoon of flax seeds that have been hanging around in our pantry.

The lemon flavour is quite subtle and the saltiness of the asiago cheese makes for a nice savoury scone. Ladies and gentlemen, we have a winner.

That’s it for today. Next up is a 1960’s classic — tomato soup and grilled cheese sandwiches. Join us for this retro double header!signature