Kale Caesar Salad

Hi!

I’ve been absent from the blog for awhile. And for this, I do apologize. I won’t give you any lame-duck excuses, but I do apologize. I’m not giving you any lame-duck recipe reviews either. Today, we’re cooking up a super-healthy version of a classic salad that dates back to the Prohibition era.

kale_caesar

Kale Caesar Salad
Even Julia Child would approve

You can find it on page 44 of the PDF version of “Good and Cheap”, where it’s simply called “Kale Salad”. (This wonderful cookbook is a free download at leannebrown.com). In the print version of “Good and Cheap”, it’s on page 31.

Ingredient Notes
This is a fairly simple recipe that takes:

  • kale
  • homemade croutons
  • homemade dressing
  • Romano cheese

The dressing is a fairly typical Caesar salad dressing and I made three changes to the ingredient line-up. One, I substituted Polish mayonnaise for the raw egg yolk. The mayo is probably not a perfect stand-in for the yolk, but I’m just a little squeamish about raw eggs. Two, I used Giovanni’s All-Natural Anchovy Paste in place of an anchovy fillet. I like the taste of the anchovy paste and because it comes in  a tube that can be stored in the fridge, it neatly sidestepped the issue of leftover anchovy fillets. And three, I substituted mozzarella for the Romano cheese the recipe called for — because in true “Good and Cheap” style, that’s what I had in the fridge and wanted to use up.

How Did It Taste?
There’s one universal law about Caesar salad dressing. Homemade always tastes better than store-bought. Always. In fact, the gap between homemade and commercial Caesar dressing is so broad that a person might be convinced to forever banish store-bought from their table.

I’m not the world’s biggest kale fan, so even with a yummy handcrafted dressing, I went into this experiment with some skepticism.

But … my skepticism is once again proven wrong! This is really quite good. I’d happily serve it to guests and I love the taste of the homemade croutons.

Time and Money
All in, Kale Caesar Salad takes about 25 minutes to create. I made a full recipe, which came out to two fairly generous meal-size servings. The total cost for this was $5.32, which works out to $2.66 per serving.

A Little History
I had assumed that, like many other classic dishes, Caesar Salad had been invented in a restaurant in New York. Wrong! The original Caesar Salad was the creation of  an Italian-American restaurateur named Caesar Cardini. Cardini lived in San Diego, but owned a restaurant in Tijuana, as a way of getting around the Prohibition laws in the U.S.

The back story is that on the Fourth of July weekend in 1924, Cardini threw together a bunch of ingredients he had on hand and served the salad to his friends. It became a sensation. Even Julia Child’s parents travelled to Cardini’s to try out the Caesar. In her cookbook From Julia Child’s Kitchen, the American culinary icon recalls her encounter:

My parents, of course, ordered the salad. Caesar himself rolled the big cart up to the table, tossed the romaine in a great wooden bowl, and I wish I could say I remembered his every move, but I don’t. They only thing I see again clearly is the eggs. I can see him break 2 eggs over that romaine and roll them in, the greens going all creamy as the eggs flowed over them. Two eggs in a salad? Two one-minute coddled eggs? And garlic-flavored croutons, and grated Parmesan cheese? It was a sensation of a salad from coast to coast, and there were even rumblings of its success in Europe.

And that’s it! In my next post, I’ll be catching you up on how the financial end of this year-long experiment has been going. Thanks for tuning in!
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